A Decade of Dove

If you know me, or even if you’ve read my past blog posts, you know how I feel about the media’s portrayal of women – I don’t like it. I don’t like that the media tells us that what is beautiful is a stick thin model with a perfect tan, straight teeth and amazing clothes. Simply put, that is an unattainable ideal and I am sick of it being the norm.

So, I’d like to take everyone back to 2004, when the Dove brand revealed its findings from a major study it conducted called The Real Truth About Beauty: A Global Report.  This study found that only two percent, yes two percent, of women would consider themselves beautiful. That’s a startling and sad statistic, one that is rooted in society’s narrow definition of what beauty is.

So, in 2004, 10 years ago, Dove launched its Campaign for Real Beauty. The campaign is considered to be one of marketing’s greatest success stories as it has opened the world to discussion and conversation about the limiting definition of beauty in today’s culture. Below is a brief timeline of some of the major events of the Dove Campaign for Real Beauty.

Image

2004: The campaign launched with an ad featuring women whose looks challenged society’s traditional definition of “beautiful.”

2005: Dove launched the most iconic phase of its campaign, with an advertisement featuring six women with real bodies and real curves, aimed at knocking the idea that only thin is beautiful.

2006: When Spain announced that overly thin models would be banned from fashion runways, Dove felt that it had to respond, as this was an issue at the heart of their campaign. They produced a short film titled Evolution that showed the transformation of a real woman into a supermodel. The movie aimed to show viewers just how unrealistic this idealized version of beauty really is.

In the same year, Dove founded the Dove Self-Esteem fund which was created to inspire and educate young girls, and to help them recognize a wider definition of beauty. As a result, they released a commercial titled Little Girls at the Super Bowl, which reached approximately 89 million viewers.

2007: The third phase of the campaign was a major global study called Beauty Comes of Age. This study revealed that 91 percent of women ages 50-64 believe that society needs to change its views on women and aging, to grow more accepting of the beauty of aging. The campaign celebrated women over 50, with wrinkles and gray hair, reminding the world that beauty knows no age limit.

The same year, the company launched an online film called Onslaught as a reminder that the media sensationalizes an unattainable, unrealistic perception of what beauty really is. The women we see in magazines are photoshopped and have an army of makeup artists and personal trainers, and are far from representative of real women.

The Dove campaign for real beauty continues to grow and expand, and it continues to draw attention to the fact that the media’s portrayal of such a narrow definition of beauty has harmful effects. According to research, today’s fashion models are 23 percent thinner than the average female.

With so much exposure to advertisements, starting at such a young age, it’s no wonder that a study by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality found that children under 12 who were hospitalized for an eating disorder increased by 119 percent between 1999 and 2006. But, it is disturbing.

Like Dove, we each need to challenge the idea that what the media portrays women to be is all that is beautiful. With such unattainable ideals come consequences, risk of eating disorders and mental health problems. In the end, is selling through sex worth the destruction of someone’s self-esteem or self-worth? The answer is obvious, and Dove has proven that.

Let’s start a movement. Let’s shake the advertising industry. Let’s shake society. Let’s shake ourselves. Let’s change our definition of beauty.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s